Jacqueline Loonen co-author publication in Lancet Oncology

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Recommendations for gonadotoxicity surveillance in male childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancer survivors: a report from the International Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Guideline Harmonization Group in collaboration with the PanCareSurFup Consortium.

In a recent issue of the Lancet Oncology, attention was paid to the recommendations for gonadotoxicity surveillance in male childhood and young adult (CAYA) cancer survivors. These recommendations were developed by a multidisciplinary panel of the International Guideline Harmonisation Group (IGHG) in collaboration with the PanCareSurFup Consortium.

Attention to late effects after cancer treatment is becoming more important since advances in treatment have enormously improved survival rates. Unfortunately, surviving cancer has been accompanied by the occurrence of late treatment related complications. In CAYA cancer survivors,  iatrogenic reproductive failure and endocrine disturbances are frequently encountered late effects which have a major impact on quality of life. Guidelines for fertility preservation in cancer patients, prior to therapy, and gonadotoxicity surveillance after treatment, are essential in order to provide appropriate interventions and improve quality of life.

As surveillance guidelines, developed in different countries, varied in recommendations, in 2010, the International Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Guideline Harmonisation Group (IGHG) was initiated, aiming to establish a common vision and integrated strategy for the surveillance of late effects in CAYA cancer survivors. Recommendations for gonadotoxicity surveillance in male CAYA survivors, presented in the current publication, were developed using the evidence-based methodology of the IGHG and were graded according to the strength of underlying evidence and potential benefit gained by early detection and appropriate management.

The process used in the development of this guideline has revealed several substantial knowledge gaps for clinical research that could improve surveillance of gonadotoxicity in male CAYA survivors. The Dutch Childhood Oncology Group initiated a national cohort study (Principle Investigator Jacqueline Loonen) to address these gaps. The project: “Impaired spermatogenesis and testosterone deficiency in male survivors of childhood cancer: a DCOG-LATER study”, was recently awarded funding by the Dutch Cancer Society.

Publication Lancet Oncol 2017


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